Dietary Fiber

What is dietary fiber?

There are two different types of dietary fiber: soluble and insoluble fiber. Both forms of fiber are important to overall health and digestion but function differently. Total Dietary Fiber on the Nutrition Facts Panel is made up of soluble and insoluble fiber.

What is soluble fiber?

Soluble fiber is a specific type of fiber that absorbs water and swells, to form a thick/viscous, gel-like material during digestion. The soluble fiber in oatmeal is associated with various health benefits, as it may help lower blood cholesterol levels to support heart health. It also may help slow digestion and the release of blood glucose into the blood stream.

What is insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is a specific type of fiber that adds bulk to stool by drawing water in, which helps promote laxation and regulatory.

How much dietary fiber should I get per day?

The Institute of Medicine recommends that women consume 25 grams and men consume 38 grams of fiber per day. However, national consumption surveys indicate that only about 5% of Americans are currently getting those amounts. Source

What are the benefits of fiber?

Research repeatedly shows that fiber has many health benefits. For example, fiber helps with laxation and regularity by keeping things moving through the digestive system, which promotes positive digestive health. Research also shows the soluble fiber in oats, called beta-glucan, may help to reduce LDL-cholesterol and therefore reduce the risk of heart disease. Three grams of beta glucan daily as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may help reduce the risk of heart disease.

Learn More

You can learn more about dietary fiber and whole grains on QuakerOats.com.

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Product Name
 
Serving Size Fiber g (%DV)
 
Soluble Fiber g
 
Insoluble Fiber g
 
(% DV)

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Product Name
 
Package Size
(Serving Size Shown)
Fiber g (%DV)
 
Soulble Fiber g
 
Insoulble Fiber g
 
(% DV)